In the History Corner… September 14, 1874 looms like a shadow over September 18, 2021

On September 14, 1874 an organized militia of white supremacists, mostly Confederate veterans and Democrats, staged an attack and attempted a coup d’etat of the elected Republican government of the state of Louisiana. It is known in history as the Battle of Liberty Place.
The insurrection and attempted coup d’etat was organized and carried out by more than 5,000 members of the White League of New Orleans. The White League was a paramilitary group created after the South lost the Civil War. Like the Ku Klux Klan and other terrorist groups, it existed across the South and was determined to return conservatives, former slave owners, and their supporters to power.
The 1872 gubernatorial race was disputed between Democrat John McEnery and Republican William Pitt Kellogg. Both men were certified, but by different boards, as the winner of the election. Both men had inaugurations. Afterward, members of the White League, supporters of McEnery, 5,000 strong and fully armed, overwhelmed the New Orleans Metropolitan Police and the state militia. They proceeded to occupy the statehouse, the arsenal, and downtown New Orleans for three days, determined to seat their candidates. They only retreated when they learned that federal troops were on the way.

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MVSU hosts 7th Annual B.B. King Day Symposium ‘Women in Blues’

Dr. Jerryl Briggs, Sr., President of Mississippi Valley State University, welcomed a large audience of Blues fans, students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the community-at-large to the 7th Annual B.B. King Day Symposium that was headlined by celebrated “Women in Blues” on Thursday, September 2, 2021.

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In the History Corner… The March on Washington, again

n Saturday, August 28, 2021, while listening to Rev. Al Sharpton, Bishop William Barber, Rev. Bernice King, and others, and observing the march itself, it was easy to travel back in mind to August 28, 1963, as Martin Luther King, John Lewis, and other civil rights and labor leaders staged a March on Washington and spoke in front of the Lincoln Memorial.
It was easy to let one’s mind do the walking because the march last weekend was the anniversary of that march. It was easy because in a little less than two years, on March 7, 1965, many of those same civil rights leaders were involved in Bloody Sunday, the March from Selma to Montgomery Alabama.
The march this past Saturday was easy to remember because it reminds one of the threatened March on Washington in 1941. Saturday’s march could even conjure up memories of the Million Man March and several other marches led by African American citizens over the years.

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In the History Corner… September 14, 1874 looms like a shadow over September 18, 2021

On September 14, 1874 an organized militia of white supremacists, mostly Confederate veterans and Democrats, staged an attack and attempted a coup d’etat of the elected Republican government of the state of Louisiana. It is known in history as the Battle of Liberty Place.
The insurrection and attempted coup d’etat was organized and carried out by more than 5,000 members of the White League of New Orleans. The White League was a paramilitary group created after the South lost the Civil War. Like the Ku Klux Klan and other terrorist groups, it existed across the South and was determined to return conservatives, former slave owners, and their supporters to power.
The 1872 gubernatorial race was disputed between Democrat John McEnery and Republican William Pitt Kellogg. Both men were certified, but by different boards, as the winner of the election. Both men had inaugurations. Afterward, members of the White League, supporters of McEnery, 5,000 strong and fully armed, overwhelmed the New Orleans Metropolitan Police and the state militia. They proceeded to occupy the statehouse, the arsenal, and downtown New Orleans for three days, determined to seat their candidates. They only retreated when they learned that federal troops were on the way.

Read More »

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A Salute to Dr. Ivory Phillips!

Dr. Ivory Phillips has been a contributing writer to the Jackson Advocate for 42 years. He has been instrumental in highlighting issues in the Jackson community that deal with education and politics.

Mississippi Voices

WHEN?

By Anne T. Sulton, Ph.D., J.D.JA Senior International Correspondent Formed in 2018, the Global Center on Adaptation is a diverse group of world leaders working

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