The Jackson Advocate Turns 83

In 1938, Percy Greene started the Jackson Advocate newspaper. Many who are Jackson residents and/or supporters and subscribers of our publication may know a little bit about its history. The Jackson Advocate has been an institution in the Black community for 83 years now, and even though the burden can sometimes feel heavy on my shoulders, I’m proud to be a part of this legacy and a part of the continuation of a tradition of Black excellence and upliftment.  One thing that sometimes escapes my mind in its importance is that the Jackson Advocate is a business. As I’ve grown to look at the impact of the legacy my family has had on this publication – beginning when my dad, Charles Tisdale, purchased the newspaper from Greene’s wife Frances in 1978 – there’s no doubt that the desire and goal was to make sure that we were heavy on the

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Congress considers Medicaid expansion workaround to provide health care to poor Mississippians

Democrats in the U.S. Congress are considering a way to offer health care insurance for low income Mississippians who have been denied coverage because of the refusal of the state’s political leadership to expand Medicaid.
The proposal would provide health care coverage to people who are below the federal poverty level (an individual making $12,880 per year or less) in the 12 primarily Southern states — including Mississippi — that have not expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

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Atty. Orr elected president of AILA

Attorney Allen Orr, Jr. was recently elected president of the American Immigration Lawyers Association.
AILA, as it is known, is headquartered in Washington, D.C and was founded in 1946. It is the oldest immigration bar association in the United States and has a membership of over 15,000 attorneys and law professors who practice and teach immigration law. AILA members represent families seeking permanent residence for close family members, as well as businesses seeking talent from the global marketplace. The organization’s members also represent foreign students, entertainers, athletes, and asylum seekers, sometimes on a pro bono basis. AILA is a non-partisan nonprofit organization that provides continuing legal education, information, professional services, and expertise through its 38 chapters and over 50 national committees.

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After 13 years, Black and Missing Foundation still searching for tens of thousands of people of color

It’s been 13 years since Natalie Wilson and her sister-in-law Derrica Wilson founded the Black and Missing Foundation to help bring attention and closure to the ever-growing number of cases in minority communities.
As incomplete and cringe-worthy, the number of the missing – one count suggests that of the more than 600,000 individuals currently reported missing, more than 200,000 are individuals of color – Wilson forges ahead.
She does so, even 13 years and some success stories later, emotionally.
“We’ve come a long way,” Wilson declared during a recent visit to the new, state-of-the-art National Newspaper Publishers Association’s (NNPA) television studios in Washington, D.C.
During a conversation with NNPA President and CEO Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., Wilson punctuated the need for the Black and Missing Foundation with the story of Phoenix Colden, a young African American woman who went in 2011 missing near St. Louis, Missouri.

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Explore

The Jackson Advocate Turns 83

In 1938, Percy Greene started the Jackson Advocate newspaper. Many who are Jackson residents and/or supporters and subscribers of our publication may know a little

Read More »

Congress considers Medicaid expansion workaround to provide health care to poor Mississippians

Democrats in the U.S. Congress are considering a way to offer health care insurance for low income Mississippians who have been denied coverage because of the refusal of the state’s political leadership to expand Medicaid.
The proposal would provide health care coverage to people who are below the federal poverty level (an individual making $12,880 per year or less) in the 12 primarily Southern states — including Mississippi — that have not expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

Read More »

Gallery

Media

A Salute to Dr. Ivory Phillips!

Dr. Ivory Phillips has been a contributing writer to the Jackson Advocate for 42 years. He has been instrumental in highlighting issues in the Jackson community that deal with education and politics.

Mississippi Voices

WHEN?

By Anne T. Sulton, Ph.D., J.D.JA Senior International Correspondent Climate change adaptation involves designing and implementing strategies to deal with the known risks and anticipated

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No more waiting to exhale: Black Mississippi women are digging out causes of inequities that harm us

Author Terry McMillan penned the quintessential manifesto for Black women when her book, “Waiting to Exhale,” was released in the early 1990s. She may not have known it at the time, but the stories of Savannah, Bernadine, Robin, and Gloria created a space for Black women to be seen as vulnerable, loving, sentient and, yes, flawed. We are people who deserved the same in return – to be loved and heard and seen and supported and of course, to breathe and keep on breathing.
That connection would become even more pronounced with the advent of the book’s visual component – a film of the same name and story line released in 1995 – and now during the fourth wave of a global pandemic having strong and often devastating impacts on women’s lives and families, that connection and space are needed now more than ever.

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